Assessment of RE

Assessment of RE
 
The RE Subject Leader in school has produced a set of progression documents for each year group to ensure that the skills been taught are being built on year on year and that there is a clear progression of skills as a child progresses through the school. Each year group's progression statement is then split into three categories to allow the class teacher to judge attainment for each child in their class.
 
The three categories are:
  • Working towards the expected standard (WT)
  • Working at the expected standard (WA)
  • Working at greater depth within the expected standard (GD)
Below are the end of Year Expectations for each year group 
 
Key stage 1
At the end of year 1 pupils will:
Identify special places, days and objects related to the questions studied / aspects covered
 Identify special books and know some key teachings for the religions studied.
Recount some religious stories and recognise some religious objects
Reflect on their own identity and experiences. 
Ask questions and give opinions about religious and non-religious worldviews.
Reflect on their own values, attitudes and commitments.
 
At the end of year 2 pupils will
Talk or write about some key teachings in at least two religious and nonreligious worldviews.
Talk or write about special places, days and objects in at least two religions in relation to the topics studied
Show understanding of the meaning of stories and symbols relating to the topics covered.
Recognise that others' identity and experiences are important to them.
Recognise that some ‘deep’ questions are about meaning and purpose. 
Recognise and respond to examples of others’ values, attitudes and commitments and share their own.
 
 
Lower key stage 2
At the end of year 3 pupils will 
Talk or write about key teachings with increased depth.
Identify the key details of some stories. 
Talk or write about special places, days and objects and their significance to believers. 
Explain why stories and symbols are significant to believers.
Respond to others' identity and experiences. 
Respond to questions about meaning and purpose. 
Recognise that values, attitudes and commitments are often rooted in religious teachings and authority.
 
 
At the end of year 4 pupils will 
Use correct terminology when talking or writing about special places, days, rituals and objects and key beliefs and teachings
explain the details of significant stories.
explain some ways that different religions can share common features. 
Understand that symbolic meaning and significance can be expressed in a variety of ways. 
Make connections between their own identity and experience and that of others.
Reflect on what is special and significant in their own lives and/or realise that there are puzzling and difficult questions. 
Show some understanding of values, attitudes and commitments in relation to stories and teachings, beliefs and practices.
 
Upper key stage 2
At the end of year 5 pupils will
Understand the significance of key writings and teachings.
Understand and make connections between key teachings in religious and non-religious worldviews.
Understand some of the ways in which believers interpret story and symbolism and use language and ritual to convey meaning.
Reflect on links and comparisons between their own and others’ identity and experience. Formulate questions of meaning and purpose.
Reflect on moral issues in their own lives, in relation to their understanding of religious and non-religious worldviews
 
At the end of year 6 pupils will 
Understand the significance of key writings and teachings for the followers of religious and non-religious worldviews.
Understand the significance of worship, rituals and values for the followers of religious and non-religious worldviews and make comparisons between the religions and beliefs studied.
Explain how believers give meaning to symbols, story, language etc. and make some links between beliefs, practices and ways of expressing meaning. 
Formulate questions on their own and others’ experiences and suggest some possible responses.
Reflect on some questions of meaning and purpose in their own lives and suggest some possible responses.
Discuss moral questions, recognising that there are different views to be considered.